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“In the long arc of history, no human creation has had a greater positive impact on more people more rapidly than free-enterprise capitalism. It is unquestionably the greatest system for innovation and social cooperation that has ever existed” John Mackey and Raj Sisodia co-authored this book In order to return capitalism back to its roots. …


Cities of Commerce was written by Oscar Gelderblom. It focuses on the institutional trade in the low countries during the medieval period and early modern Europe.

The book explores the Political and legal fragmentation of sovereigns that allowed cities to adopt a Free market economy. Due to this, Leadership in commerce shifted from one city to another, there were no predetermined winners of this competition because many cities had commercial potentials as a result of institutional changes.

City merchants adopted Private Order Solutions to decentralized trading activities from the central government which mitigated opportunism, violence and promote an inclusive access…


“Each successful multiple-occupancy income property in real estate, beside comprising a community, is a growing island of profitable proprietary administration, a point of health in the world social fabric.” — Spencer MacCallum

We hope you enjoy this month’s Governance Gauge: for more reading material, you can always visit our reading list for more on governance, special economic zones, best practices and studies!

In this work, Spencer MacCallum further develops the concept of proprietary communities and contractual community organization.

First of all, what is a proprietary community? MacCallum defines this term as any multiple-occupancy income properties in real estate. This includes…


“When we think about the future, we hope for a future of progress. That progress can take one of two forms. Horizontal or extensive progress means copying things that work — going from 1 to n. Horizontal progress is easy to imagine because we already know what it looks like. Vertical or intensive progress means doing new things — going from 0 to 1. Vertical progress is harder to imagine because it requires doing something nobody else has ever done.” — Peter Thiel

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“The need for more technologically advanced industrialization in developed regions led to the creation of science, research and technology- oriented industrial parks and innovation areas. Managed by professionals able to promote the culture of innovation and stimulate and oversee the flow of knowledge and technology among universities, R&D institutions, companies and markets, these parks facilitate the creation and growth of innovation-based companies through incubation and provision of other high value-added services along with high quality space and facilities.” — UNIDO

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“For it is the potential function of property in land, when rightly understood as the contractual distribution of a community’s sites and resources and of access to its public advantages, not only to distribute these things peaceably and impartially to the most productive occupiers and users but also to provide the sites, and those who shall physically occupy them, with such protection and security and other services as will induce the voluntary recompense or value called land value or ground rent. This affords a purely contractual, non-political and non-compulsive process — a purely business and voluntary exchange method — of…


“The economic primacy of major cities is rarely matched by their formal governing powers. Governance matters for competitiveness because proactive government, public, and civic groups can marshal investment from a wide variety of domestic and international sources to enable new growth strategies.” — Jesus Leal Trujillo and Joseph Parilla

We hope you enjoy this month’s Governance Gauge: for more reading material, you can always visit our reading list for more on governance, special economic zones, best practices and studies!

In this work, Jesus Leal Trujillo and Joseph Parilla from Brookings create a new framework for evaluating global cities.

The report…


“For SEZs to be truly beneficial, they must solve political problems rather than economic ones. Thus, rather than seeking the optimal fiscal benefits, governments should focus on the rules and institutional setups of SEZs.” — Lotta Moberg

We hope you enjoy this month’s Governance Gauge: for more reading material, you can always visit our reading list for more on governance, special economic zones, best practices and studies!

In this work, Lotta Moberg provides a comprehensive analysis of political economy aspects of Special Economic Zones.

A political economy framework treats government officials as possessing imperfect knowledge and reacting to incentives like…


“Increasingly it will be more apparent to people that we should separate nonterritorial systems from territorial systems of goods. With technological progress, people are going to demand greater latitude to form nonterritorial systems across geographies based on individual interests and beliefs. Of course, the devil is in the implementation. But the idea is straightforward: it’s time we divorced nonterritorial systems of goods from territorial systems.” — Max Borders

We hope you enjoy this month’s Governance Gauge: for more reading material, you can always visit our reading list for more on governance, special economic zones, best practices and studies!

In this…


“Founding new communities will take patience, ambition, and a strong ethical character. This guide is a set of tools to complement the vision and leadership ability of founders who are exploring the next iteration of governance. Never before have entrepreneurs been in such a prime position to induce positive social change. In this new age, criticism is simply not enough. It’s time to create the world people have desired, but until now, could not achieve. Don’t argue. Build.” — Mark Frazier and Joseph McKinney

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Institute for Competitive Governance

The Institute for Competitive Governance is a nonprofit institution which studies special jurisdictions throughout the world.

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